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Daughters of Reykjavik go crazy in isolation with new video out now

by Khyle Deen. Published Fri 15 May 2020 13:30

Iceland’s nine-piece rap collective Daughters of Reykjavik go crazy in quarantine in the video for new single ‘Thirsty Hoes’, out now. You can watch the video in our video box.

After abandoning the planned video shoot of their new album’s big new single, the group came together in isolation for the most creative 9 way video call to end all video calls.

The concept showcases each members’ individuality within the collective, with the group performing ‘Thirsty Hoes’ at home in what eventually descends into a collage of wild scenes, expressing how quickly they all go crazy in isolation.

Steiney Skúladóttir says… “We’ve planned to do a video at this time, but then Corona happened. We came up with this idea on a group call as a way to make a video whilst staying at home and following the rules. We really like how it shows that Daughters of Reykjavik is made up of 9 individual parts.”

‘Thirsty Hoes’ has long been Daughters of Reykjavik’s anthem. As the oldest track on the album it’s been performed all over Europe and is one of the most popular moments in their set. Salka Valsdóttir adds… “When the song begins, the crowd almost immediately starts jumping. Then gradually a mosh pit starts forming and eventually everybody in the crowd will be chanting "Thirsty Hoes" like crazy. This song just goes off like a ball of energy.”

At a time where their UK tour and showcase at The Great Escape has been cancelled, the single offers a vital sense of the band’s live energy, creativity and individuality.

Further diving into the members’ personalities and all the themes explored across the album, the group have released a critically acclaimed podcast praised by The Observer, NME, BBC Radio 4 and featured on Apple Podcasts over International Women’s Day.

‘Soft Spot’ will be released 29th May 2020, ahead of a show at Iceland Airwaves in November.



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