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Ghostbusters: Afterlife - the sequel that nearly spooked Scotland

by Andy Johnson. Published Thu 25 Nov 2021 10:07, last updated: 25/11/21

The much anticipated Ghostbusters: Afterlife has hit cinema screens and is delighting audiences with an obsessively thought out and passionately penned love letter to the original 80s films.

Jason Reitman, son of Ivan, can lay claim to being the first Ghostbusters fan after watching Bill Murray, Sigourney Weaver and Dan Ackroyd at work with his dad.

Last time we saw Peter Venkman, Ray Stanz, Egon Spengler and Winston Zeddmore, New York was being taken over by the second coming of a 16th-century tyrant, powered by a river of slime running beneath the city streets.

For any readers unfamiliar with the 1089 sequel, who think that plot sounds far-fetched, the original script for Ghostbusters II went even further – across the Atlantic to Scotland, no less.

In his first draft, writer Dan Ackroyd, (Ray Stantz) imagined Dana was kidnapped by ghouls and taken to an underground civilisation in The Highlands.

According to the November 1989 issue of magazine Cinefex, the Ghostbusters would then have had to travel for three days through a tube to rescue her from a 'fairy ring.'

On reflection, Ackroyd deemed his own plan as “really too far out” and turned his imagination back to New York.

He told Cinefex: “It was probably too inaccessible, though I thought at the time I wrote it, that it was the direction we should go in.

“I wanted to leave New York City behind because I thought we had done that… my original concept for going underground was different.

“It involved a pneumatic tube 2000 miles long that they travelled in for three days, it was like a primitive mail chute.”

Sounds like an adventure most fans would be happy to see. With talk of a new Ghostbusters TV show in the works, who knows where the spooks will pop up next...



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